Tag Archives: Zymbit

Measure the air quality in your backyard


Zymbit is measuring the air quality underneath a flight path with a custom sensor board, Arduino Zero and Raspberry Pi. 


Our friends at Zymbit are located in Santa Barbara, not too far from the county’s municipal airport. Residents of their local community were a bit concerned over how flight patterns overhead affected their environment and overall health. And so, the team decided to develop a system to easily monitor the air quality in their backyards to determine once and for all if their well-being was, in fact, was impacted by airplane departures and arrivals.

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For this project, Zymbit built and deployed five air quality stations, each tasked with measuring different air quality parameters using the combination of commercial grade sensors, Raspberry Pi and Arduino. These units were then connected through Zymbit’s proprietary software to generate real-time charts. The data is further integrated into environmental analysis software from Groundswell Technologies, too. This allows the Santa Barbara residents to essentially “see the air they breathe.”

The complete system is attached to a modified solar radiation shield crowned with an IP67 enclosure, while all the sensors are mounted to a custom motherboard. Sensor data is acquired using an Arduino Zero (Atmel | SMART SAM D21) located within the top tier of the radiation shield. From there, data is packaged and sent to a Raspberry Pi via a serial connection, which is external to its waterproof IP65 housing. As Zymbit notes, this way the heat is properly dissipated and does not affect sensor measurements.

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Meanwhile, the Raspberry Pi acts as the connection gateway and publishes the packaged data to zymbit.com/console. For immediate purposes, data flow is unidirectional — meaning, the unit is not subscribing to any outside streams, though this could easily be integrated. Additionally, with room to spare in the Raspberry Pi enclosure, the Zymbit crew added a PoE (Power Over Ethernet) splitter for versatility. This makes installation simple and improves overall reliability since the unit only requires a single cable connection and POE can handle wide line voltage variations. The user can then choose either a Wi-Fi or Ethernet connection. Of course, a USB cable will also work to power the unit.

At the heart of the air quality station lies a custom designed sensor board that integrates multiple sensor types, such as particulate matter, carbon dioxide, relative humidity, temperature and barometric pressure.

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“The particulate sensor was the primary driver for the board’s design; it uses a small convection heater to circulate air and this requires the module to be oriented vertically,” Zymbit’s Evan Fairchild explains. “The particulate matter sensor has two channels; one for ~ 2.5 micron particles and one for ~ 10 micron particles. Each channel produces pulses which are measured and accumulated over thirty second intervals. The other sensors are managed via I2c bus and are all averaged over 15 second intervals.”

Once data is published, it is stored in the Zymbit Cloud. There, it is easy to interact with using instant dashboards or the Zymbit API. For this application, the engineers at Groundswell Technologies — who also collaborated on this project — utilized the API to pull the raw data into their analysis and visualization software.

At the moment, five Zymbit air quality stations have been successfully deployed and are active in their area of interest. Impressively, each unit only required less than an hour to install and to begin receiving data.

“Data streams from each unit are now being integrated into Groundswell’s geospatial software,” its creators add.

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Zymbit hardware is self-contained and designed to operate outdoors in a nominally shaded area. For the initial pilot, connection to the Internet is established via Wi-Fi or Ethernet to host building gateway/router. For subsequent projects, Zymbit has plans to provide options for solar power and cellular connection.

Interested? You can find all of the real-time data here, and learn all about the project on its official page.

Rewind: Atmel @ World Maker Faire 2015


Maker Faire New York, Maker Faire New York — a show (and tell) so good we had to say it twice.


Ah, Maker Faire. The only place that can you find everything from a 30-foot-tall, flame-throwing robot and a life-sized game of Mousetrap to a pancake printing machine and a floating head choir that sings when you press their keys.

Over the weekend of September 26th and 27th, tinkerers, modders and hackers of all ages flocked a jam-packed Atmel booth housed inside the always popular Maker Pavilion. There, we showcased a number of gizmos and gadgets that have successfully made its way “From the MakerSpace to the MarketPlace.” Meaning, this particular batch of startups have demonstrated what it takes to bring an idea from mere prototype to full-blown product, many by way of crowdfunding. Among those on display included the Kickstarter sensation and wrist-friendly Keyboardio, the credit-card sized gaming system Arduboy, 14-year-old Quin Etnyre and his Qduino Mini, former Pixar engineer Erin Thompson’s Modulo boards, Microduino’s super LEGO-like modules, and Zippy Robotics’ soon-to-launch Prometheus PCB milling machine. Oh, and who could forget big names like Bosch, Arduino and the one-and-only Massimo Banzi, too?

When it came to projects driven by our mighty AVR and Atmel | SMART MCUs, it didn’t stop at our booth either. In fact, countless others throughout the fairegrounds proudly showed off their embedded creations, with some of them even paying a special visit to our tent like PancakeBot, Zymbit, Dr.Duino and eight-year-old CEO Omkar Govil-Nair with his Arduino-based O Watch, to name just a few. On top of all that, several Atmel team members — Bob Martin, Henrik Flodell, Sander Arts and Artie Beavis — took the World Maker Faire stage to talk prototyping, Arduino, debugging, STEM and how to take your product mainstream.

So with another incredible event in the books, let’s take one last look back before flipping the page to Rome!

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Secure your Raspberry Pi and Linux applications with ZymKey


ZymKey makes it easy to secure your IoT applications and manage them in the real world.


More times than not, developers are faced with two bad options: either deliver a substandard product quickly, or reinvent the wheel and miss the market altogether. Luckily, one Santa Barbara-based startup has come up with a solution, not just a band-aid but a true fix to the all too common conundrum. Introducing ZymKey, a tiny, low-cost piece of hardware for authenticating and encrypting data between Internet of Things devices.

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The key integrates silicon and software into a simple, ready-to-go package that will automatically work with Raspberry Pi and other Linux gadgets. What’s nice is that the ZymKey integrates seamlessly with Zymbit’s existing IoT platform, which includes Zymbit.Connect software, the Zymbit.City community and the Zymbit.Orange secure IoT motherboard that was on display back at Maker Faire Bay Area. Together, Zymbit enables IoT professional developers and Makers innovate faster with the confidence of data security and integrity.

“The Internet of Things will reach its full potential when real people like you and I begin to connect our devices and share data streams,” explained Zymbit CEO Phil Strong. “Then we can work together to solve real problems that impact our everyday lives. Funding our Kickstarter campaign is not just about building the ZymKey, it’s about enabling an entire community of people to collaborate around secure data streams and ideas.”

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Ideally, Zymbit will make it easy to not only collect but to share data in a trusted manner. The platform embraces open technologies and gives people the freedom to innovate quickly without having to compromise security or performance. Aside from that, the so-called Zymbit.City will serve as a forum for those with common interests to collaborate on ideas powered by such verified and authenticated information.

ZymKey works by attaching to IoT Linux platforms like the Raspberry Pi. When combined with Zymbit’s Linux APIs, it offers true authentication and cryptographic services of remote devices, as well as a real-time clock and accelerometer to timestamp security events and detect physical tampering, respectively. For its Kickstarter launch, ZymKey is available in two versions: a header-mounted crypto key for the RPi and a USB stick that plugs into the port of a Linux board, including BeagleBone, UDOO and Dragon.

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For the RPi model, the low-profile hardware attaches directly to the Pi’s expansion header while still allowing Pi-Plates to be added on top. Lightweight firmware drivers run on the RPi core interface with software services through Zymbit.Connect. Meanwhile, the USB version adds more functionality and is usable on any Linux unit with a USB host.

“Great security has to be designed end to end. From silicon to software, from point of manufacture through end-of-life. ZymKey brings all this together and makes it easy to manage your applications and devices out in the real world, without compromising security,” the team explains. “ZymKey integrates speciality silicon with firmware drivers on the host device and the corresponding software services in the cloud. The result is a robust and secure communication workflow that meets some of the highest standards in the industry.”

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Both ZymKeys are embedded with an ATECC508A CryptoAuthentication IC for bolstered security, while the USB version also features an Atmel | SAM D21 Cortex-M0+ core. Once connected to the Zymbit platform, you will have the unprecedented ability to transparently manage all of your remote devices from a single console — upgrade over the air, configure admin rights, and so much more. Additionally, you will be able to publish, subscribe and visualize secure data. Each ZymKey comes pre-packed with dashboard widget that make it simple to customize and share with others.

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So whether you’re connecting one Linux gizmo in your garage to a public forum or have tens of thousands of Raspberry Pis deployed throughout the world, ZymKey seems to be an excellent option for everyone. Interested? Head over to its Kickstarter page, where the Zymbit team is seeking $15,000. Delivery is slated for December 2015.

Enhance Raspberry Pi security with ZymKey


In this blog, Zymbit’s Scott Miller addresses some of the missing parts in the Raspberry Pi security equation. 


Raspberry Pi is an awesome platform that offers people access to a full-fledged portable computing and Linux development environment. The board was originally designed for education, but has since been embedded into countless ‘real world’ applications that require remote access and a higher standard of security. One of, if not, the most notable omissions is the lack of a robust hardware-based security solution.

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At this point, a number of people would stop here and say, “Scott, you can do security on RPi in software just fine with OpenSSL/SSH and libgcrypt. And especially with the Model 2, there are tons of CPU cycles left over.” Performance is not the primary concern when we think about security; the highest priority is to address the issue of “hackability,” particularly through remote access.

What do you mean by “hackability?”

Hackability is a term that refers to the ease by which an attacker can:

  • take over a system;
  • insert misleading or false data in a data stream;
  • decrypt and view confidential data.

Perhaps the easiest way to accomplish any or all of the aforementioned goals is for the attacker to locate material relating to security keys. In other words, if an attacker can gain access to your secret keys, they can do all of the above.

Which security features are lacking from Raspberry Pi?

Aside from not having hardware-based security engines to do the heavy lifting, there’s no way to secure shared keys for symmetric cryptography or private keys for asymmetric cryptography.

Because all of your code and data live on a single SD card, you are exposed. Meaning, someone can simply remove the SD card, pop it into a PC and have possession of the keys and other sensitive material. This is particularly true when the device is remote and outside of your physical control. Even if you somehow try to obfuscate the keys, you are still not completely safe. Someone with enough motivation could reverse engineer or work around your scheme.

The best solution for protecting crypto keys is to ensure the secret key material can only be read by standalone crypto engines that run independently from the core application CPU. This basic feature is lacking in the Raspberry Pi.

Securing Raspberry Pi with silicon and software

With this in mind, Zymbit has decided to extract some of the core security features from the Zymbit.Orange and combine them into a tiny device that embeds onto the Raspberry Pi, providing seamless integration with Zymbit’s remote device management console. Meet the ZymKey!

ZymKey for secure remote device management

ZymKey brings together silicon, firmware drivers and software services into a coherent package that’s compatible with Zymbit’s secure IoT platform. This enables a Raspberry Pi to be accessed and managed remotely, firmware to be upgraded and access rights to be administered.

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Secure software services

Zymbit’s Connect libraries enhance the security and utility of Raspberry Pi in the following ways:

  • Add message authentication to egress messages to the Zymbit cloud by attaching a digital signature, which proves that the data originated to a specific Raspberry Pi/Key combination. (Meaning that it was not forged or substituted along the way).
  • Assist in providing security certificates to the Zymbit cloud.
  • Authenticate security certificates from the Zymbit cloud.
  • Optionally help to encrypt/decrypt the content of messages to/from the Zymbit cloud.

Data that is encrypted/authenticated through ZymKey will be stored in this encrypted/authenticated form, thereby preserving the privacy and integrity of the data.

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In addition to its standard attributes, developers can access lower level features through secure software services, including general cryptography (SHA-256 MAC and HMAC with secure keys, public key encryption/decryption), password validation, and ‘fingerprint’ services that bind together specific hardware configurations.

Stealth hardware

ZymKey’s low-profile hardware plugs directly into the Pi’s expansion header while still allowing Pi-Plates to be added on top. Lightweight firmware drivers run on the RPi core and interface with software services through zymbit.connect. It should also be noted that a USB device is in the works for other Linux boards.

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At the heart of the ZymKey is the newly released ATECC508A CryptoAuthentication IC. Among some of its notable specs are:

  • ECC asymmetric encryption engine
  • SHA digest engine
  • Random number generator
  • Unique 72-bit ID
  • Tamper prevention
  • Secure memory for storing:
    • Sensitive key material – an important thing to point out is that private keys are unreadable by the outside world and, as stated above, are only readable by the crypto engine.
    • X.509 security certificates.
    • Temporary items: nonces, random numbers, ephemeral keys
  • Optional encryption of transmitted data across the I2C bus for times when sensitive material must be exchanged between the Raspberry Pi and the ATECC508A

Life without ZymKey

Raspberry Pi can be used with the Zymbit Connect service without the ZymKey; however, the addition of ZymKey ensures that communications with Zymbit services are secured to a higher standard. Private keys are unreadable by the outside world and usable only by the ATECC508A, thus making it difficult (if not practically impossible) to compromise.

Each ZymKey has a unique set of keys. So, if, on the off chance that a key is compromised, only that key is affected. Simply stated, if you have several Raspberry Pi/ZymKey pairs deployed and one is compromised, the others will still be secure.

Once again, it is certainly possible to achieve the above goals purely through software (OpenSSL/libgcrypt/libcrypto). However, especially regarding encryption paths, without ZymKey’s secure storage, key material must be stored on the Raspberry Pi’s SD card, exposing private keys for anyone to exploit.

Stay tuned! The ZymKey will be making its debut on Kickstarter in the coming days.

Why should you care about securing your IoT devices?


In this blog, Zymbit’s Scott Miller reviews some of the security features of Zymbit.Orange, how they work, and more importantly, why they matter.


Internet of Things (IoT) devices are, by nature, light on resources, diverse, widely proliferated and often at the ‘edge’ of the network beyond the control of any network administration; perfect ingredients for digital chaos and anarchy!

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Cloud and big data applications depend on the quality of the data they ingest and key factors in quality are the authenticity, integrity and privacy of data they collect from the edge for the network. For the IoT to get real sustainable traction, the data coming from such edge devices must be “trusted” — from the core silicon all the way to the data services.

Fortunately, the Zymbit platform addresses many of the common security threats found in real world applications, whether using embedded ARM CPUs or Maker development boards. For Raspberry Pi and Arduino developers, Zymbit.Orange IoT motherboard makes it easy for developers to implement applications with secure access to communications interfaces as well as cryptographic services. What’s more, Zymbit.Orange can also be used standalone.

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In this blog, Zymbit VP of Embedded Scott Miller reviews some of the key security features of Zymbit.Orange, how they work, and more importantly, why they matter.

Who Should Read This Blog?

  • Anyone building IoT devices who is not a security expert, and doesn’t have the time or budget to become one;
  • Anyone who has deployed a connected embedded design;
  • Any Maker using Raspberry Pi or Arduino at the edge of the network… and now needs to add security.

Security Considerations for IoT Edge Devices

Securing IoT devices requires a system architecture that addresses some fundamental needs. Let’s take a look at them:

Data Privacy

Generally speaking, data should be kept private if it is integral to a proprietary process or if it is personal in nature. In each case, the data must be protected from prying eyes using encryption techniques that extend from the publishing source — the IoT edge device — to the cloud and onwards to subscribers. Additionally, the administrator of the data should be able to select who or what is able to subscribe to the data stream.

Data Authentication

Most data transactions/interactions are based upon the assumption that you know that the data really came from the presumed edge device. But how can you be sure? And, how can you be sure that your subscribers are receiving that authentic data?

In order for data to be trusted, it must be proven that it originated from a given edge device at the time that it was reported to have been recorded. Data authentication can be accomplished in many ways, but a digital signature is generally regarded as one of the most secure. One application of a digital signature applied to a timestamped block of data involves computing a one-way hash (e.g. SHA-256) of the timestamped data block and then asymmetrically encrypting the hash using a private key. When the data is received at the cloud, the hash of the data is computed and is compared to the hash that accompanied the data block after it is decrypted using the public key. If the hashes are the same, the data is optionally stored on the Zymbit cloud server along with the signature and transferred to the subscribers in a manner similar to the way the edge device transferred it to the cloud.

IP Protection & Threats from Counterfeits

Counterfeit products have an adverse economic impact on businesses and they also introduce serious vulnerability into enterprise systems. In the industrial sectors there have been numerous examples of ‘black market’ spares and generic devices that have introduced back doors into large scale enterprise systems, so much so that the U.S. Government has its own hotline for reporting such breaches.

Zymbit.Orange employs a number of architectural strategies with the goal of protecting software IP:

  • Isolate embedded services in special purpose hardware (e.g. dedicated embedded CPUs) so that it becomes harder to “hack & crack” an application running on an app CPU:

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  • Some of these embedded services include:
    • Securely transacting data through otherwise unsecured channels:
      • Ethernet
      • Wi-Fi
      • Cellphone modem
      • Low-power radio
    • Interacting with and controlling attached user interfaces
    • Collecting physical data from sensors that are serviced by the embedded services hardware cluster
    • Generic encryption/decryption and data authentication/validation
    • Application image update and application health monitoring
  • These isolated embedded services require valid credentials in order to authenticate the users (e.g. applications running on Arduino or Raspberry Pi) of those services.
  • The special purpose CPUs must have their hard programming paths (e.g. JTAG or SWD) disabled so that the firmware that runs on them cannot be hijacked, replaced or corrupted.
  • Tamper event detection (e.g. attempts to open the case or manipulate the real time clock) — when a tamper event is detected various actions can be taken. Some of these actions might include:
    • Recording the tamper event
    • Deliberately “bricking” the system by erasing critical firmware
    • Erasing critical data which would take the system offline
    • The above actions can be configured by the system administrator
  • Application designers must have the means to encrypt and attach digital signatures for the application images they produce. Image decryption and signature validation are accomplished using the embedded services mentioned above.
  • Software updates can be exclusively disseminated via a secure cloud network utilizing encryption and image authentication.

Malicious Attack Defense

Although we aren’t hearing too much about it yet in the press, malicious attacks will soon be launched on IoT devices in a manner similar to PC viruses and cell phones today. Motivations will range from ‘hackers because they can’ to corporate espionage to cyber terrorism. And the the consequences of such attacks can be much more serious than data loss; many IoT devices interact with the physical world and that can cause bodily harm even loss of life. If you think this is sensationalist then wait until the first examples begin to surface.

The good news is that the serious innovators amongst us are thinking about this and looking for solid and practical solutions. Malicious attacks can be prevented or made very difficult to achieve using the same countermeasures we reviewed earlier in IP protection.

Securing Your Edge Devices – Raspberry Pi and Arduino, Too

We love the accessibility and affordability of open source devices and support the communities that are building amazing applications using Arduino and Raspberry Pi. Yet neither was designed with core security in mind and consequently, before applications can be scaled, their vulnerabilities need to be addressed. So let’s first explain their security shortcomings:

Security Vulnerabilities – Raspberry Pi:

  • No built in cryptographic engine
    • While the Pi can perform encryption in software, overall performance suffers as a result.
  • Removable SD card – no physical security
    • This means that an attacker with direct access to a Raspberry Pi based device can steal and clone the software and data on the card or deliberately corrupt the contents of the card.
  • No secure key store
    • Because the SD card is removable and the SD card is the only means of storing anything on the Pi, shared static keys and private certificates are now completely viewable and modifiable. Even if one chooses to encrypt a data volume for key and certificate storage, the key for decrypting the data volume must be exposed at some point. This fact makes data authentication on the Pi infeasible.
  • Susceptibility to power cycling exploits
    • Because there is frequently no intrusion detection or monitoring, simple repeated power cycling of the device may lead to failure and thus denial of service.
  • Lack of real-time clock
    • Prevents the system from responding properly in case of communications outage.

Security Vulnerabilities – Arduino:

  • No built in cryptographic engine
    • Crypto shields are available for purchase, but packaging Arduino shields tends to be very clumsy and difficult to deploy, not just due to the physical size issues associated with stacking shields but also because the Arduino shield framework suffers from resource bus (SPI/I2C) and GPIO pin allocation issues, so simply stacking a new shield on an Arduino may prove to be impossible when other shields are stacked.
  • No way to validate or secure the Arduino executable image if the debugging/programming interface is available. Even if an Arduino based “thing” had a crypto shield attached, an attacker with direct access could potentially:
    • Corrupt or erase the executable image.
    • Gain access to shared keys stored in RAM or flash.
    • “Patch” in their own code which would allow them to take control of the system.
  • Many Arduinos have very limited amounts of RAM and flash, making it extremely difficult to implement robust, secure communications solutions.

Zymbit has solved these problems for Raspberry Pi and Arduino developers by implementing an isolated security framework on the Zymbit.Orange IoT motherboard.

Adding Security With the Zymbit.Orange IoT Motherboard

At the heart for the Zymbit.Orange architecture is a Secure Services Cluster that isolates edge facing application CPUs from each other and from the outbound network connection. Isolation is achieved using a combination of data security (authenticate and encrypt), power security (turn off the CPU) and physical security (tamper proof and enclosure intrusion detection).

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We use Atmel silicon for all three aspects of security because their solutions are well thought out, affordable and have good performance characteristics.

Secure Silicon Review

The security services cluster within Zymbit.Orange is comprised of three blocks:

Secure Communications Hub

  • Atmel | SMART SAM E70 – high performance advanced connectivity CPU
  • Primary purpose:
    • Provides secure access to communications and UI interfaces
    • Performs tamper detection
    • Provides secure software updates for applications processors via the Zymbit cloud
  • CPU features:
    • 300MHz Cortex-M7
    • AES encryption engine
    • Low latency TRNG (True Random Number Generator)
    • Integrity Check Monitor (ICM) for generating and comparing digests of certain memory areas

Supervisory MPU

  • Atmel | SMART SAML21J17A – ultra low-power microcontroller unit
  • Primary purpose:
    • Power supervision and monitoring
    • Real-time clock
    • Secure programming and debugging interface for the on-board Arduino Zero application CPU
  • CPU features:
    • 48MHz Cortex-M0+
    • AES encryption engine
    • Low latency True Random Number Generator (TRNG)

Secure Key Generation and Storage

  • Atmel ATECC508
  • Primary purpose:
    • Asymmetric (public key) crypto
    • Digital signature generation/validation
    • Password validation
  • Features:
    • Secure key storage
    • Asymmetric encryption
    • Ephemeral key generation

Using these components, Zymbit.Orange provides a secure interface to all essential services for user applications running on the on-board Arduino Zero and/or Raspberry Pi. The dedicated on-board hardware significantly increases the overall security of these platforms without interfering with user applications. It is just as easy to develop an Arduino or Linux project on Zymbit.Orange from scratch or to adapt an existing application to take advantage of the on-board services because they do not interfere with the application CPU programmability.

Photos: Atmel @ Maker Faire Bay Area 2015


And just like that, another flagship Maker Faire event has come to an end.


From life-sized humanoids and stair-climbing robots to pancake printers and drum-playing pants, Maker Faire Bay Area 2015 had it all. Over the weekend, tinkerers, modders and hackers of all ages and skills flocked a jam-packed Atmel booth, which showcased a number of uber-cool demos under this year’s theme “From Makerspace to Makerplace.” Among those on display included 14-year-old Quin Etnyre, DrumPants, Zymbit, littleBits, Zippy Robotics, Primo and of course the heart of the Maker community, Arduino. When it came to gizmos and gadgets driven by versatile 8- and 32-bit AVR and Atmel | SMART MCUs, it didn’t stop within our exhibit. In fact, countless other DIYers throughout the fairegrounds proudly showed off their embedded projects as well.

Here’s a look back at the two-day show (and tell) in photos…

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11 projects we saw and loved at MakerCon


Here’s a look at some of the impressive projects from MakerCon 2015.


Maker Week is well underway and safe to say that MakerCon kicked things off with a bang. There, we had the chance to engage in several lively discussions, listen to industry thought-leaders and visionaries, as well as receive hands-on demonstrations from some of today’s rising startups. As we walked through the historic Palace of Fine Arts during the two-day event, we couldn’t help but note the collection of innovative gizmos and gadgets on display at MakerCon Showcase — which is essentially a mini Maker Faire in itself. From a pancake printer to a smart aquaponics system, the showcase had it all. Here’s a handful of the impressive projects we had a chance to get up close and personal with… (For the rest of you, we’ll be sure to catch up with you at Maker Faire!)

Modulo

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Currently live on Kickstarter, Modulo was founded by former Pixar engineer Erin Tomson as a way to take the hassle out of building electronics. The set includes a series of tiny chips, each equipped with its own little processor (ATtiny841) responsible for the operation and communication with a controller board (ATmega32U4). These modules easily slide right into a Modulo Base that securely holds them in place and electrically links the devices without the usual tangle of wires.

PancakeBot

Pancake

As its name would suggest, PancakeBot allows Makers to print out flapjacks into just about any design one can imagine. Not only developed to inspire, entertain and bring out the creativity at home, the machine has some serious commercial appeal for brands wanting to make a lasting impression. The ATmega2560 based breakfast bot uses a proprietary system to extrude the ingredients as it glides over the griddle, while the combination of compressed air, a special vacuum and an on-board interface helps control batter flow.

Zymbit

Zymbit

Santa Barbara startup Zymbit debuted the first three products within its evolving Internet of Things suite: the Zymbit Orange edge device, the Zymbit Iris interactive display and Zymbit Connect software. The platform is being billed as the first pre-configured hardware and software solution that is a finished, secure, out-of-the-box-ready product for seriously creative Makers and developers looking to get their connected prototypes off their desk and into the market in days, not months.

Flutter Wireless

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Born out of his own frustration of wirelessly connecting two Arduino boards, Taylor Alexander went on to invent Flutter Wireless, which not only gained enormous popularity among the DIY crowd but garnered over $150,000 on Kickstarter back in 2013. The $36 wireless Arduino with a half-mile range lets users develop mesh networking protocols and smart devices in an efficient yet inexpensive manner. It’s perfect for robotics, consumer electronics, wireless sensor networks, and educational platforms. Flutter is packed with a powerful Atmel | SMART SAM3S Cortex-M3 processor, while an ATSHA204 crypto engine keeps it protected from digital intruders.

uARM

UARM

The brainchild of Shenzhen startup EVOL, uArm is a desktop 4-axis parallel-mechanism arm, modeled after the ABB industrial PalletPack robot. The project is comprised of laser cut acrylic or wood parts, powered by standard RC hobby servos and controlled by an ATmega328 embedded custom board.

Kijani Grows

Kijani

Kijani Grows produces and installs smart aquaponics gardens for homes, schools and corporate settings. The latest version of its garden kit is driven by a Linux/Arduino controller board (Atheros AR9331 and ATmega2560) that enables the system to remotely detect and respond to physical environments.

Keyboardio

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Makers Jesse Vincent and Kaia Dekker are looking to revolutionize the traditional QWERTY layout with their butterfly-shaped keyboard that places a greater emphasis on the thumb, lessens the stress on your pinkies, and offers a more natural position for the hand and wrist — something that may prove to be a lifesaver for those suffering from carpal tunnel or arthritis. Keyboardio puts keys such as control, alt, delete, shift and a new ‘function’ button under the typists’ palms, all within easy reach of the thumbs. What’s more, the gadget is Bluetooth-enabled permitting users to switch between devices and carry it from one meeting to the next.

Tapster

Tapster

Jason Huggins built a robotic contraption capable of mimicking the human touch as way to test and automate new software applications on mobile devices. Programmed with Node.js, Johnny-Five and Arduino, Tapster is entirely open-source and can be configured specifically to a user’s liking.

Future Make Technology

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While many of today’s 3D printing products rely on a feed of ABS/PLA plastic that is heated and extruded through a hot nozzle, the Future Make crew seeking to change that with the launch of their 3D pen Polyes Q1. Unlike other devices on the market, photo-polymer ink is spit out of a cool nozzle and immediately solidified when exposed to blue LED light. What this means is no more nasty smells or burns!

Gigabot

Gigabot

Gigabot, re:3D’s flagship technology, gives Makers the ability to 3D print industrial strength, extremely large objects at an affordable price point. With a build envelope of 24” x 24” x 24” and a robust aluminum frame, the machine can construct objects up to 30 times larger than competing desktop models.

DomeCandy

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In an effort to revolutionize the boombox, one South Carolina startup has digitally fabricated an open-source, Arduino-compatible Bluetooth speaker kit for Makers.