Tag Archives: Reza Kazerounian

Atmel’s SmartConnect lineup targets the IoT

Atmel has expanded its wireless product portfolio with a new family of solutions targeting the rapidly evolving Internet of Things (IoT). Essentially, the new SmartConnect family combines Atmel’s ultra-low power MCUs with its wireless solutions and complementary software into a single package, allowing designers to easily add wireless connectivity to any embedded system. This new lineup includes Atmel’s SmartConnect Wi-Fi modules, an integration of the company’s ultra-low power Wi-Fi System-on-Chip with a Cortex M0+ ARM-based MCU, and the SmartConnect ZigBee SAM R21, a single-chip integrating Atmel’s ultra-low power ZigBee solution with a Cortex-M0+-based MCU.

SmartConnect_chip

Atmel’s SmartConnect solutions can be deployed across a wide range of markets, helping to accelerate development time for cost-effective, battery-operated applications in the residential, healthcare, industrial, smart energy and wearable spaces.

“Atmel’s Wi-Fi solutions deliver industry-leading low-power consumption and are the leading market solution for power-constraint applications such as remote controls,” explained Reza Kazerounian, Sr. Vice President and General Manager, Microcontroller Business Unit, Atmel Corporation.

“Atmel also has a long history of providing ultra-low power wireless connectivity for sophisticated applications that are IEEE 802.15.4-compliant, IPv6/6LoWPAN-based and ZigBee-certified for nearly a decade. [Our] broad portfolio of wireless products combine the company’s rich family of RF transceivers with 8- and 32-bit AVRs and ARM-based MCUs.”

As Kazerounian notes, ultra-low power wireless connectivity is critical for embedded applications in the era of the Internet of Things.

“[That is why] Atmel’s SmartConnect technology is about simplifying the use of embedded wireless connectivity technologies and enabling users to accelerate their time-to-market. This simplicity allows all players to participate in the IoT market, fueling the innovation needed to accelerate adoption,” he added.

Greg Potter, Analyst, SNL Kagan MRG, expressed similar sentiments.

“With over 50 billion devices predicted to be connected by 2020, it’s important for embedded companies to provide an ultra-low power turnkey solution that brings a complex mix of embedded and connectivity technologies in a single package,” he said.

“Atmel’s new SmartConnect family does just that by coupling ultra-low power MCUs with Wi-Fi and ZigBee connectivity into a single package. The company’s breadth of easy-to-use IoT solutions, ranging from embedded processing to connectivity and software/tools, will enable more designers to bring their connected devices to market.”

Key facts about Atmel’s SmartConnect family

SmartConnect Wi-Fi

Providing designers with flexibility to help accelerate development, this new family of modules bring wireless Internet connectivity to any embedded design. 

The first products are an ultra-low power lineup of Wi-Fi modules that enable battery-powered IoT endpoints such as thermostats, temperature sensors through Wi-Fi connectivity – without compromising battery life.

These highly integrated modules will enable designers to lower their overall bill of materials while integrating IEEE 802.11 a/b/g wireless connectivity. 

Additionally, the new Wi-Fi modules provide an integrated software solution with application and security protocols such as TLS, integrated network services (TCP/IP stack) and standard Real Time Operating System (RTOS) which are all available via Atmel’s Studio 6 integrated development platform (IDP). 

SmartConnect Wi-Fi is slated to kick off mass production in May 2014.

SmartConnect ZigBee SAM R21



Building on Atmel’s long history of ultra-low power ZigBee solutions, these new products integrate Atmel’s ARM Cortex-M0+-based MCUs with a robust peripheral set and its high-performance RF transceiver. 

The new single-chip series is available in extremely small 5x5mm 32-pin and 7x7mm 48-pin package, effectively saving board space and reducing the overall bill of materials. The devices ship in a variety of memory densities and are qualified for industrial temperature grades up to 125C, making them ideal for wireless lighting control applications such as ZigBee Light Link.

These new devices are fully supported by the wireless composer in Atmel’s Studio 6 IDP and help accelerate development time. 

The ATSAM R21 Xplained PRO board is already available at the official Atmel Store, with Atmel currently sampling the ATSAM R21 series to select customers. Public sampling will be available at the end of March with production quantities slated for July 2014. Pricing for the SAM R21? Starting at $2.75 in 10,000-piece quantities.

Video Diary: Atmel @ CES 2014

It’s day two of CES 2014! Atmel is showcasing a number of devices, technologies and platforms for MakerSpaces, garages and living rooms. Check out the videos below to see what we’ve been up to!

Atmel tech reps at CES 2014 talk microcontrollers (MCUs), autotmotive technology, Arduino, Makers, biometric security, encryption, key fobs, tablets, 3D printers and medical devices.

Atmel is at the heart of the DIY Maker community – powering nearly every desktop 3D printer and Arduino board on the market today, along with a number of wearable platforms and devices. In this video, we interview a wide range of personalities about the rapidly growing movement, including Atmel’s Reza Kazerounian, Matt Richardson of Make Magazine and Michael Shiloh of Arduino.

Atmel’s latest touch solutions explained at CES 2014.

Atmel’s Bob Martin, Manager, MCU Central Applications Group, talks about the evolution of CES over the years, with a specific emphasis on the DIY Maker community.

Atmel Community Manager, Sylvie Barak, welcomes you to 3D print your ideas at CES 2014. Tweet #AtmelCES and come on by MP25958.

An inside look at 3D printing with the Atmel-powered MakerBot Replicator 2 at CES 2014. Tweet #AtmelCES.

After a long day at CES 2014 this on/off (0/1?) demo was pretty addictive – providing hours of endless entertainment for our tired crew.

FreeMotion Library selected for Atmel’s SAM D20

Atmel has selected Sensor Platforms’ FreeMotion Library as part of a rapidly growing ecosystem to support its low power, high-performance flexible SAM D20 Cortex M0+ core.

As we’ve previously discussed on Bits & Pieces, the ARM-based SAM D20 core is specifically tailored for sensor hubs and sensor-focused software. Its optimized features and flexible development ecosystem allow Atmel customers to create unique and differentiating products incorporating always-on sensors.

“As sensors increasingly find their way into all kinds of mobile devices, wearables and IoT (Internet of Things) applications, there is a huge premium on providing always-on functionality at a tiny fraction of system power – and we found this in the FreeMotion Library from Sensor Platforms,” said Dr. Reza Kazerounian, Sr. VP and GM, Microcontroller Business Unit, Atmel Corporation. “Software from our partners is available now and compatible with our own development environments.”

Dan Brown, CEO of Sensor Platforms, expressed similar sentiments and noted that the company’s low-power solution offers best-in-class capabilities to optimize power consumption, thereby enabling longer battery life.

“[Our] FreeMotion Library makes sensor fusion and user context awareness available in smartphones and tablets, in order to: combine and process data from installed sensors and microprocessors; better interpret users’ movements and situations; and infer users’ intents,” Brown explained.

“The library makes it easy for device OEMs to purchase their sensors and microprocessors from multiple suppliers without damaging user experience. It also automatically optimizes sensor and platform power consumption based on user movement and contexts to enable longer battery life.”

Make Magazine reviews Atmel Maker Faire panel

On September 20, Atmel kicked off the 2013 World Maker Faire with a star-studded analyst panel moderated by Windell Oskay, the co-founder of Evil Mad Scientist Laboratories.

Participants included Arduino co-founder Massimo Banzi; Dr. Reza Kazerounian, Senior Vice President and General Manager of Atmel’s Microcontroller Business Unit; Suzanne Deffree of EDN; Brian Jepson, an editor with Maker Media (publisher of MAKE Magazine); Annmarie P. Thomas, an associate professor at the University of St. Thomas; Bob Martin from Atmel’s MCU applications team and Quin Etnyre, a 12-year-old Maker who loves to teach Arduino classes.

The panel received coverage from a number of prominent publications, including MAKE Magazine. In fact, as noted above, Brian Jepson of MAKE was a member of the analyst lineup.

When someone asked about makers in education, Brian Jepson said: “A Maker will teach you how to pick locks, but they won’t teach you how to break into a bank.”

Meanwhile, Arduino co-founder Massimo Banzi said that he was more proud that he’d got the Arduino into Radio Shack, than he was about the board itself.

“The Radio Shack deal was an achievement, not the product. The Maker Movement is changing the way people teach, learn and think. It allows you to have access to certain tech at a lower price,” Massimo told panel attendees. “[Remember], many closed source [hardware devices] aren’t as reliable and easy as the [Atmel-powered] Arduino. The value of open source is that you can really look at code, build upon what others have done. We don’t think the Maker Movement is about the future, it’s about the present.”

Indeed, as Atmel’s Reza Kazerounian noted, bringing businesses closer to the open source community will help empower both Makers and the industry.

“The open source community could be the start of the next big commercial engineering project,” he added.

Meanwhile, Annmarie P. Thomas said she had observed that Makers often spend time creating things they are passionate about.

“The Maker Movement redefines the classroom, it makes us want to celebrate curiosity and inventiveness, returning us to a time where people still understand how things work even if they aren’t engineers. Obviously, the Maker Movement isn’t really new, and the cool thing about design and making, there’s no right answer. It’s [definitely difficult] to engineer something without being a Maker first,” she explained.

“One of the really exciting things about the Maker Movement is that it’s more about the making, less about the tools. Whatever you can obtain, you start with. The Maker Movement is about lowering cost of hardware, yes, but even more about the community pitching in. [Plus], more schools are now adopting Arduino and many university programs want to see students come in with a portfolio.”

Atmel’s Bob Martin expressed similar sentiments.

“The Maker Movement makes learning more fun, exciting and practical, allowing brilliant individuals such as Quin Etnyre to move forward and succeed. Personally, I’m trying to encourage my daughters to take their toys apart and build things. I was always a big fan of LEGO, which is probably why I’m a Maker.”

Prototyping is as easy as Uno, Due, Tres

The long-awaited 2013 World Maker Faire kicks off on September 21st in the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI). We’ll be there in the Arduino pavilion, showcasing a number of innovative devices powered by Atmel-based Arduino boards.

MakerFaireRibbon

Atmel’s Bob Martin will also be taking center stage at the show with a presentation titled “Prototyping is as Easy as Uno, Due, Tres.” According to Martin, the Ardruino Uno is an excellent lab tool for technicians and hardware engineers who have a specific design in mind.

During the presentation, Atmel will demonstrate how our MCU apps lab uses the Uno to test harnesses for LED lighting, SBC reset response and power supply stress-testing for a weather station prototype. So be sure to stop by and see Atmel’s Arduino prototyping demo on Sunday, September 22, 2013, 12:30PM – 1:00PM ET at the electronics stage.

We’ll also be hosting a public media/industry analyst panel on Friday, September 20th, on the Maker Community and education. Members of the panel include Atmel’s Reza Kazerounian, co-founder of Arduino Massimo Banzi, Atmel Maker and Hexbug guru Bob Martin, university engineer professor Annmarie Thomas, EDN’s Executive Editor Suzanne Deffree, 12-year old CEO and maker Quin (Qtechknow), and MAKE Books Senior Editor Brian Jepson. The panel will be moderated by Windell H. Oskay of Evil Mad Scientist Laboratories.

Tune into our live Twitter feed of the panel starting at 11:30 am ET on September 20th under #Atmelmakes or visit our recently launched microsite for more details. Interested in attending Atmel’s panel? Be sure to email us at pr@atmel.com. For those of you who plan on visiting the Faire, Atmel’s booth is showcasing a number of uber-cool exhibits and demos including:

  • Hexbug/hovercraft hacking: Watch Atmel employees hack traditional Hexbugs and hovercrafts using Arduino boards.
  • MakerBot: We’ll be showcasing the wildly popular AVR-powered 3D printer and providing 3D samples over the weekend.
  • Pensa: This company uses Arduino boards to make their flagship DIWire, a rapid prototyping machine that bends metal wire to produce 2D and 3D shapes.
  • Infinity Aerospace: The ArduLab – powered by Atmel’s versatile ATMega 2560 microcontroller – is a highly capable experimentation platform ready for space right out of the box. Sensor mounting is straightforward, with unique functionality addressing the technical challenges of operating in space.

Additional exhibitors at the Atmel World Maker Faire booth include Fuzzbot (robots), Evil Mad Scientist and Colorado Micro Devices. We’re looking forward to seeing you, so don’t forget to follow us at @makerfaire, @atmel and @arduino!

Atmel to host analyst panel @ World Maker Faire

The 2013 World Maker Faire opens its doors on September 21st in the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI). We’ll be there at the Atmel booth in the Arduino pavilion, showcasing a number of exciting new companies that have developed innovative applications using Arduino boards powered by Atmel AVR and ARM microcontrollers.

Atmel is slated to host a public media/industry analyst panel on Friday, September 20th, on the Maker Community and education. Members of the panel include Atmel’s Reza Kazerounian, co-founder of Arduino Massimo Banzi, Atmel Maker and Hexbug guru Bob Martin, university engineer professor Annmarie Thomas, EDN’s Executive Editor Suzanne Deffree, 12-year old CEO and maker Quin (Qtechknow), and MAKE Books Senior Editor Brian Jepson. The panel will be moderated by Windell H. Oskay of Evil Mad Scientist Laboratories.

Tune into our live Twitter feed of the panel starting at 11:30 am ET on September 20th under #Atmelmakes or visit our recently launched microsite for more details. For those of you attending the Faire, Atmel’s booth will be taking center stage at the show with a number of uber-cool exhibits and demos including:

  • Hexbug/hovercraft hacking: Watch Atmel employees hack traditional Hexbugs and hovercrafts using Arduino boards.
  • MakerBot: We’ll be showcasing the wildly popular AVR-powered 3D printer and providing 3D samples over the weekend.
  • Pensa: This company uses Arduino boards to make their flagship DIWire, a rapid prototyping machine that bends metal wire to produce 2D and 3D shapes.
  • Infinity Aerospace: The ArduLab – powered by Atmel’s versatile ATMega 2560 microcontroller – is a highly capable experimentation platform ready for space right out of the box. Sensor mounting is straightforward, with unique functionality addressing the technical challenges of operating in space.

Additional exhibitors at the Atmel World Maker Faire booth include Fuzzbot (robots), Evil Mad Scientist and Colorado Micro Devices. We’re looking forward to seeing you at the Atmel booth, so don’t forget to follow us at @makerfaire, @atmel and @arduino!

Interested in attending Atmel’s panel? Be sure to email us at pr@atmel.com. Also, be sure to join us when Bob Martin presents Prototyping is as Easy as Uno, Due, Tres.

MakerFaireRibbon

The Ardruino Uno is an excellent lab tool for technicians and h/w engineers who have a specific design in mind. In this presentation, we will show how Atmel’s MCU apps lab uses the Uno to test harnesses for LED lighting stress testing, SBC reset response and power supply stress testing on a regular basis for the weather station prototype.

When: Sunday, September 22, 2013, 12:30PM – 1:00PM ET
Where: Make: Electronics Stage