Tag Archives: Internet of Things

IoT spending will grow from $699 billion in 2015 to $1.3 trillion in 2019


Billions of devices, trillions of dollars! Insurance, healthcare and consumer markets expected to see the fastest growth over the next five years.


Worldwide spending on the Internet of Things is expected to be $698.6 billion this year and grow at a 17% CAGR to nearly $1.3 trillion in 2019, according to the International Data Corporation (IDC).

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At the moment, the Asia-Pacific region accounts for more than 40% of worldwide IoT spending, followed by North America and Western Europe. The APAC’s activity is being fueled by developing countries’ continuing technology investment needs, government investments incorporating more IoT components, and a burgeoning new consumer class spending more on smart goods and services.

However, the regions that will experience the fastest growth in IoT spending over the five years are Latin America (26.5% CAGR), followed by Western Europe, and Central and Eastern Europe.

While manufacturing and transportation led the world in IoT spending ($165.6 billion and $78.7 billion, respectively) in 2015, the insurance, healthcare and consumer verticals are projected to experience the fastest growth through 2020.

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The IDC also points out some of the unique fastest growing use cases in each global region. Take North America, for example. The IoT is thriving thanks to retailers deploying in-store contextual marketing like beacons, real-time streams of data from mobile devices, online consumer activity, as well as video cameras to gain insight into behavior and trends.

In Asia-Pacific, vehicle-mounted devices are being employed to monitor driver behavior to determine insurance rates, whereas in EMEA, a great deal of money is being poured into smart buildings to automate maintenance and operations. Meanwhile in Latin America, the fastest growing IoT category is field service, where service data is automatically measured, recorded and transferred remotely for monitoring and use by technicians.

This report piggybacks off recent research from Gartner which estimated that by the end of 2016, 6.4 billion devices will be connected to the Internet with as many as 5.5 million new things joining every day. That number represents a 30% jump from 2015, and will continue rising to 20.8 billion by 2020.

SmartEgg connects all your remotes to your phone


A truly universal and eggscellent remote for the Internet of Things.


It seems like today we have remote controls for everything and keeping track of them can be a hassle. Our current home entertainment systems alone require more than one remote to rev up our TV, cable box, audio system and DVD player. Do we honestly use all the buttons on each of these remotes? Unlikely. The team at AICO Technologies are making things easier for us by replacing all of those remote controls with just one.

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You may be thinking, “But universal remotes already exist!” True, but what’s been on the market is either only for home entertainment or smart home automation. What about the other appliances with controls in our house? Meet SmartEgg, an all-in-one smart remote that pairs to your phone. It not only controls your home electronics, but also your thermostat and any infrared devices via Bluetooth.

SmartEgg is backed with a cloud database that already contains a growing list of over 5,500 remote controllers and 125,000 infrared hex codes, so it can sync your phone to any of your devices. Additionally, SmartEgg has self-learning capabilities for the slim chance that your gadget is not in the database.

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Since SmartEgg stores all the control keys of your appliances, you can combine keys from any of those controllers to fit your scene. Its user-friendly interface allows you to customize the control buttons by removing unwanted buttons and reordering them. Now you’ll have a control with only the functions you need. This is ideal for your home entertainment experience. The process of turning on your TV and DVD player, then switching to DVD input and pressing play, is minimized to a single click.

What really sets SmartEgg apart from other universal remotes is its smart technology. Living up to its name, SmartEgg interacts with other devices if certain conditions are meet. For example, it can mute the TV when you’re receiving a call or set the thermostat an hour early before you arrive home from work. The unit employs Bluetooth Low Energy proximity sensing, also known as iBeacon technology, which triggers a scene automatically whenever your phone is detected nearby.

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The SmartEgg boasts a wireless reach of 20m (65ft) indoors and 50m (164ft) outdoors, as well as an infrared range of more than 10m (32ft). With SmartEgg, you no longer have the inconvenience of replacing batteries for your various remote controls. Its battery consumes less energy, making it last over 12 months.

Interested? Head over to the SmartEgg’s Kickstarter page, where the AICO team is nearing its $50,000 goal. Delivery is expected to get underway in February 2016.

Security coprocessor marks a new approach to provisioning for IoT edge devices


It’s worth noting that security breaches rarely involve breaking the encryption code; hackers mostly use techniques like spoofing to steal the ID.


The advent of security coprocessor that offloads the provisioning task from the main MCU or MPU is bringing new possibilities for the Internet of Things product developers to secure the edge device at lower cost and power points regardless of the scale.

Hardware engineers often like to say that there is now such thing as software security, and quote Apple that has all the money in the world and an army of software developers. The maker of the iPhone chose a secure element (SE)-based hardware solution while cobbling the Apple Pay mobile commerce service. Apparently, with a hardware solution, engineers have the ecosystem fully in control.

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Security is the basic building block of the IoT bandwagon, and there is a lot of talk about securing the access points. So far, the security stack has largely been integrated into the MCUs and MPUs serving the IoT products. However, tasks like encryption and authentication take a lot of battery power — a precious commodity in the IoT world.

Atmel’s solution: a coprocessor that offloads security tasks from main MCU or MPU. The ATECC508A uses elliptic curve cryptography (ECC) capabilities to create secure hardware-based key storage for IoT markets such as home automation, industrial networking and medical. This CryptoAuthentication chip comes at a manageable cost — 50 cents for low volumes — and consumers very low power. Plus, it makes provisioning — the process of generating a security key — a viable option for small and mid-sized IoT product developers.

A New Approach to Provisioning

It’s worth noting that security breaches rarely involve breaking the encryption code; hackers mostly use techniques like spoofing to steal the ID. So, the focus of the ATECC508A crypto engine is the tasks such as key generation and authentication. The chip employs ECC math to ensure sign-verify authentication and subsequently the verification of the key agreement.

The IoT security — which includes the exchange of certificates and other trusted objects — is implemented at the edge node in two steps: provisioning and commissioning. Provisioning is the process of loading a unique private key and other certificates to provide identity to a device while commissioning allows the pre-provisioned device to join a network. Moreover, provisioning is carried out during the manufacturing or testing of a device and commissioning is performed later by the network service provider and end-user.

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Presently, snooping threats are mostly countered through hardware security module (HSM), a mechanism to store, protect and manage keys, which requires a centralized database approach and entails significant upfront costs in infrastructure and logistics. On the other hand, the ATECC508A security coprocessor simplifies the deployment of secure IoT nodes through pre-provisioning with internally generated unique keys, associated certificates and certification-ready authentication.

It’s a new approach toward provisioning that not only prevents over-building, as done by the HSM-centric techniques, but also prevents cloning for the gray market. The key is controlled by a separate chip, like the ATECC508A coprocessor. Meaning, if there are 1,000 IoT systems to be built, there will be exactly 1,000 security coprocessors for them.

Certified-ID Security Platform

Back at ARM TechCon 2015, Atmel went one step ahead when it announced the availability of Certified-ID security platform for the IoT entry points like edge devices to acquire certified and trusted identities. This platform leverages internal key generation capabilities of the ATECC508A security coprocessor to deliver distributed key provisioning for any device joining the IoT network. That way it enables a decentralized secure key generation and eliminates the upfront cost of building the provisioning infrastructure for IoT setups being deployed at smaller scales.

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Atmel, a pioneer in Trusted Platform Module (TPM)-based secure microcontrollers, is now working with cloud service providers like Proximetry and Exosite to turn its ATECC508A coprocessor-based Certified-ID platform into an IoT edge node-to-cloud turnkey security solution. TPM chips, which have roots in the computer industry, aren’t well-positioned to meet the cost demands of low-price IoT edge devices.

Additionally, the company has announced the availability of two provisioning toolkits for low volume IoT systems. The AT88CKECCROOT toolkit is a ‘master template’ that creates and manages certificate root of trust in any IoT ecosystem. On the other hand, AT88CKECCSIGNER is a production kit that allows designers and manufacturers to generate tamper-resistant keys and security certifications in their IoT applications.

mbed eval boards showcase focus on IoT software and connectivity


Chipmakers like Atmel are joining hands with ARM to bring the entire ecosystem under one roof and thus facilitate the creation of standards-based IoT products.


ARM’s mbed operating system is winning attention in the highly fragmented embedded software space by promising a solid software foundation for interoperable hardware and thus scale the Internet of Things designs by narrowing the development time.

Atmel has put its weight behind ARM’s mbed OS by launching the single-chip evaluation board for the IoT ecosystem in a bid to ensure low software dependence for the embedded developers. The leading microcontroller supplier unveiled the mbed evaluation platform at the recent ARM TechCon held in Santa Clara, California.

The mbed OS platform is focused on rapid development of connected devices with an aim to create a serious professional platform to prototype IoT applications. So IoT developers don’t have to look to software guys for help. The mbed stack features a strong focus on enhancing the IoT’s connectivity and software components.

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ARM is the lead maintainer for the mbed OS modules while it adds silicon partners, like Atmel, as platform-specific dependencies for the relevant mbed OS modules. Silicon partners are responsible for their platform-specific drivers.

Atmel’s mbed-enabled evaluation board is based on the low-power 2.4GHz wireless Cortex-M0+ SAM R21 MCU. Moreover, Atmel is expanding mbed OS support for its Wi-Fi modules and Bluetooth Low Energy products.

The fact that Atmel is adding mbed OS to its IoT ecosystem is an important nod for ARM’s mbed technology in its journey from merely a hardware abstraction layer to a full-fledged IoT platform. Atmel managers acknowledge that mbed technology adds diversity to embedded hardware devices and makes MCUs more capable.

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There is a lot of code involved in the IoT applications and software is getting more complex. It encompasses, for instance, sensor library to acquire data, authentication at IoT gateways and SSL security. Here, the automatic software integration engine like mbed lets developers focus on their applications instead of worrying about integrating off-the-shelf software.

The mbed reference designs like the one showcased by Atmel during ARM TechCon are aimed at narrowing the development time with the availability of building blocks and design resources—components, code and infrastructure—needed to bootstrap a working IoT system. Atmel managers are confident that a quality software foundation like mbed could help bring IoT products to market faster.

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Atmel’s mbed-enabled IoT evaluation board promises harmony between hardware and software. Apparently, chipmakers like Atmel are joining hands with ARM to bring the entire ecosystem — OS software, cloud services and developer tools — under one roof, and thus facilitate the creation of standards-based IoT products. Atmel’s mbed evaluation board clearly mirrors that effort to deliver a complete hardware, software and developer tools ecosystem in order to bring IoT designs quicker to market.

The platform comprises of mbed OS software for IoT client devices like gateways and mbed Device Server for the cloud services. ARM launched the mbed software platform in 2014 and Atmel has been part of this initiative since then.

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Additionally, Atmel has tied the mbed association to its SmartConnect wireless solutions to make the best of mbed’s networking stack in the Internet of connected things. The IoT technology is built on layers, and here, interoperability of communications protocols is a key challenge.

For a start, Atmel’s SAM R21-Xpro evaluation board is embed-enabled and is built around the R21 microcontroller, which has been designed for industrial and consumer wireless applications running proprietary communication stacks or IEEE 802.15.4-compliant solutions.

Next up, the evaluation board includes SAM W25 Wi-Fi module that integrates IEEE 802.11 b/g/n IoT network controller with the existing MCU solution, SAM D21, which is also based on the Cortex-M0+ processor core.

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Furthermore, Atmel is offering an mbed-enabled Bluetooth starter kit that includes SAM L21 microcontroller-based evaluation board and ultra-low-power Bluetooth chip BTLC1000, which is compliant with Bluetooth Low Energy 4.1. Atmel demonstrated a home lighting system at the ARM TechCon show floor, which employed SAM R21-based Thread routers that passed light sensor information to an mbed-enabled home gateway. Subsequently, this information was processed and sent to the mbed Device Server using a web interface.


Majeed Ahmad is the author of books Smartphone: Mobile Revolution at the Crossroads of Communications, Computing and Consumer Electronics and The Next Web of 50 Billion Devices: Mobile Internet’s Past, Present and Future.

Measure the air quality in your backyard


Zymbit is measuring the air quality underneath a flight path with a custom sensor board, Arduino Zero and Raspberry Pi. 


Our friends at Zymbit are located in Santa Barbara, not too far from the county’s municipal airport. Residents of their local community were a bit concerned over how flight patterns overhead affected their environment and overall health. And so, the team decided to develop a system to easily monitor the air quality in their backyards to determine once and for all if their well-being was, in fact, was impacted by airplane departures and arrivals.

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For this project, Zymbit built and deployed five air quality stations, each tasked with measuring different air quality parameters using the combination of commercial grade sensors, Raspberry Pi and Arduino. These units were then connected through Zymbit’s proprietary software to generate real-time charts. The data is further integrated into environmental analysis software from Groundswell Technologies, too. This allows the Santa Barbara residents to essentially “see the air they breathe.”

The complete system is attached to a modified solar radiation shield crowned with an IP67 enclosure, while all the sensors are mounted to a custom motherboard. Sensor data is acquired using an Arduino Zero (Atmel | SMART SAM D21) located within the top tier of the radiation shield. From there, data is packaged and sent to a Raspberry Pi via a serial connection, which is external to its waterproof IP65 housing. As Zymbit notes, this way the heat is properly dissipated and does not affect sensor measurements.

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Meanwhile, the Raspberry Pi acts as the connection gateway and publishes the packaged data to zymbit.com/console. For immediate purposes, data flow is unidirectional — meaning, the unit is not subscribing to any outside streams, though this could easily be integrated. Additionally, with room to spare in the Raspberry Pi enclosure, the Zymbit crew added a PoE (Power Over Ethernet) splitter for versatility. This makes installation simple and improves overall reliability since the unit only requires a single cable connection and POE can handle wide line voltage variations. The user can then choose either a Wi-Fi or Ethernet connection. Of course, a USB cable will also work to power the unit.

At the heart of the air quality station lies a custom designed sensor board that integrates multiple sensor types, such as particulate matter, carbon dioxide, relative humidity, temperature and barometric pressure.

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“The particulate sensor was the primary driver for the board’s design; it uses a small convection heater to circulate air and this requires the module to be oriented vertically,” Zymbit’s Evan Fairchild explains. “The particulate matter sensor has two channels; one for ~ 2.5 micron particles and one for ~ 10 micron particles. Each channel produces pulses which are measured and accumulated over thirty second intervals. The other sensors are managed via I2c bus and are all averaged over 15 second intervals.”

Once data is published, it is stored in the Zymbit Cloud. There, it is easy to interact with using instant dashboards or the Zymbit API. For this application, the engineers at Groundswell Technologies — who also collaborated on this project — utilized the API to pull the raw data into their analysis and visualization software.

At the moment, five Zymbit air quality stations have been successfully deployed and are active in their area of interest. Impressively, each unit only required less than an hour to install and to begin receiving data.

“Data streams from each unit are now being integrated into Groundswell’s geospatial software,” its creators add.

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Zymbit hardware is self-contained and designed to operate outdoors in a nominally shaded area. For the initial pilot, connection to the Internet is established via Wi-Fi or Ethernet to host building gateway/router. For subsequent projects, Zymbit has plans to provide options for solar power and cellular connection.

Interested? You can find all of the real-time data here, and learn all about the project on its official page.

TrackR atlas locates your lost items


You’ll never misplace things (or pets) again!


Whether you’re an organized or messy person, you inevitably lose things or forget the last spot you saw it. What is more frustrating is that you make a bigger mess just trying to find it. You can keep a mental map of where you put things in your home, but wouldn’t it be much easier if your phone did that for you? Now with TrackR atlas, you can.

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Fittingly named, TrackR atlas maps out your home and enables room-based item monitoring of your BLE-based items. This is the second project to come from the team that created the successful TrackR bravo, a small Bluetooth tracking device that attaches to your valuable items. Atlas works with bravo and other wireless trackers to better organize your home.

The TrackR atlas plugs into a wall socket in each room of your home, and utilizes both Wi-Fi and Bluetooth Low Energy radios to detect the presence of items that have TrackR devices or third-party Bluetooth-based trackers attached to them. From the Android and iOS app, you can locate which room all of your items are in your home.

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Atlas can also notify you when things move around or leave the house. This is perfect if you have pets that tend to wander off. Among its other features, atlas has remote ringing, Amazon Alexa voice-activation, and is backed by the Crowd GPS network so you can track your items when they are missing outside of your home. You never have to aimlessly search for things again!

The tiny unit has an 802.11 b/g/n Wi-Fi radio with a range of 230 feet (70 meters), and Bluetooth 4.0 with a range up to 98 feet (30 meters). It supports wall sockets for the U.S., UK, Australia and most of Europe.

Tired of misplacing things? Head over to TrackR’s Indiegogo campaign, where they have already more than tripled their $50,000 goal. You’ll be able to pinpoint the location of your valuables starting June 2016.

Pizza delivery is only a button press away


Engineers and college students, rejoice! Takeout just got even easier.


Ordering late-night pizza is about to get a whole lot easier, thanks to Domino’s. Inspired by the Amazon Dash Button, the company has introduced what they’re calling The Easy Order system, which literally lets you summon delivery at the touch of a button.

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This isn’t the first time Domino’s has thought outside the (pizza) box. If you recall back in 2013, the fast-food chain unveiled their plans around drone delivery, and earlier this year, joked about a futuristic driverless delivery vehicles for April Fools’. They’ve even opened up a tweet to eat campaign, which allows you to order via emojis on Twitter.

The technology behind the wireless button is provided by Flic, complete with a mini cardboard box, and enables you to order your favorite pie for delivery with just one press. The Easy Order unit pairs with an accompanying smartphone app over Bluetooth and then sends your desired pizza choice to your nearby Domino’s store.

Similar to Amazon Dash, all you need to do to get started is register on Domino’s website by inserting information such as your address, payment info, and preferred pizza on file — and voilà! Once you’ve sent your order, a red light will illuminate to inform you that your large mozz with meatball (or whatever you like) is on its way.

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Currently, The Easy Order service is only limited to the UK, with the first batch being released in December as part of a social media-driven competition. A wider rollout is expected to begin sometime in February 2016.

Surely, this may not rank as the greatest use case of IoT technology; however, amid the hustle and bustle of our daily lives, it can certainly add a convenient factor. Are you ready for a lazier, more efficient way of ordering? If so, you can thank Domino’s. If you’re on a diet and trying to watch what you eat, we’re sorry. (Meanwhile, you can also check out how one Maker hacked his Amazon Dash Button for pizza delivery.)

Dojo wants to monitor and secure your IoT devices


This IoT security device will notify you of any danger through a wireless, color-coded orb.


With billions of connected things already in existence today, and a few billion more expected in the next two years, the need for security has never been greater. Cognizant of this, one Bay Area startup has come up with an innovative solution that monitors the behavior of smart devices on your network to protect and ensure the privacy of your home. Introducing Dojo.

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The brainchild of Dojo-Labs, this IoT security system is comprised of a few parts: a white dock that plugs into your Internet gateway, a pebble-like unit which receives alerts over Bluetooth and an accompanying smartphone app that puts control right in the palm of your hand. Whenever activity occurs on the network worth your attention, the light rings on the stone will start to glow in one of three colors — red, yellow and green.

Once connected to your home network, Dojo will add each respective device and begin tracking their activity, informing you of any odd or peculiar behavior. A red light suggests action must be taken, orange signifies that a problem is being fixed, and green denotes that everything is fine.

“Dojo knows when the TV is still recording your voice even if it’s off and when that data is being uploaded to the cloud,” explains Yossi Atias, co-founder and CEO of Dojo-Labs. “We all lock our front doors and yet our devices are wide open. Our homes contain our most intimate data but the security of these things is an afterthought. We created Dojo as the first technology to help us safeguard our homes.”

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Dojo doesn’t examine the incoming and outgoing content on network, but instead analyzes metadata about who the gadgets are talking to and how. The system prevents attacks and detects intrusions through machine learning and behavior tracking. It learns what’s normal for each device and then checks to see whether it’s doing anything differently. Without even having to look at the data or knowing what those threats are, Dojo can block them. It grows increasingly intelligent as new attacks and equipment are introduced.

What’s more, Dojo can sense when something is up and will immediately notify the user by displaying a simple message in the mobile app, while also changing the color emanating from the pebble. You will be prompted to either allow or block the activity, as well as communicate back to the system through that same text-messaging interface.

The Dojo approach to security and its role in the home is incredibly unique and was designed by Gadi Amit and the team at NewDealDesign. With a growing number of appliances coming online, perhaps this could be the solution to put everyone’s mind at ease.

Intrigued? Head over to Dojo’s official page here.

Pura Scents is the world’s first smart air freshener


Pura Scents lets you automate the fragrances in your home with your smartphone.


Plug-in air fresheners are great, don’t get us wrong. But sometimes they don’t emit their fragranaces at the right time or give off enough to get overcome a horrible stench. Not to mention, motion-activated ones tend to waste quite a bit of product. Instead, what if you could control those parameters all from your smartphone? That’s the idea behind one Utah-based startup’s latest solution, which is striving to make your home smell better without the hassle.

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Pura Scents is a smart air freshener dispenser that plugs directly into your wall socket and can be operated from just about anywhere via your mobile device. Each unit can hold up to two scents at once, so you can alternate aromas depending on time of day, smell intensity and duration of use. There’s even a USB port to ensure that you never lose access to your outlet.

Pura Scents connects with your smartphone via Wi-Fi, and using its accompanying app, allows you to take command of up to 100 dispensers at once. You can define your own schedules by time and room, turn the dispenser on or off, as well as adjust its color LEDs to match the current fragrance being emitted. Heading to bed? The gadget can simply be employed as a nightlight, too.

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For now, Pura Scents offers 15 different scents, including an amber, brown sugar and coconut combo, a vanilla, fresh-brewed espresso and cinnamon mix, as well as the classic smell of clean linen. Each month, the startup will introduce new aromas and recommend those to users based on their previous purchases. What’s more, they’ve also created a line geared towards men with scents containing pheromones to help set the mood when the time is right.

The idea was initially conceived after Pura CEO and co-founder Richie Stapler found himself embarrassed whenever family and friends would show up at his house unexpectedly, giving him not time to clean up. And now, that problem can be solved with a mere click of a button. Thanks to the Pura Cloud service, you can remotely access your dispenser while away or while en route back to your place.

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We wouldn’t be too surprised to see major manufactures like Glade and Febreeze jump on the bandwagon with Pura Scents-compatible units in the near future. Looking ahead, the team will provide an open API so developers can adapt the product to work with their current smart home gadgets as well.

Ready for a better smelling home? Check out Pura Scents’ Kickstarter campaign, where Stapler and his team are currently seeking $50,000. Delivery is slated for 2016.

Juvo tracks and manages your sleep from under your bed


You may know how much time you spend in bed, but are you truly well rested? Juvo will help you find out.


Sleep: We all want it, we all need it, yet we can never seem to get enough. This is a problem that one Singapore startup has set out to solve with an accurate and unobtrusive monitor that can help optimize your slumber. Whereas most wearable devices promise to quantify your sleep, they don’t necessarily manage and improve your nighttime habits. Meet Juvo.

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The system is comprised of a sensor mat that slips under your mattress, a sleek bedside device and an accompanying app, which together are capable of seamlessly tracking your vitals and Z’s in real-time. Simply stated, Juvo can make an ordinary bed smart.

How it works is fairly straightforward. You first put the fiber-optic pad under your mattress, which connects over Wi-Fi to small square gadget that sits on your nightstand. From there, Juvo will keep tabs your heart rate, breathing patterns and movement to determine if you’re awake or not, and what stage of sleep you’re in.

But that’s not all. Juvo sets itself apart from other wearable products on the market today because it doesn’t just analyze what goes on as you snooze, it integrates with popular smart home platforms, such as Philips Hue, LIFX, Nest and WeMo, to enhance your surrounding environment. You may know how much time you spend in bed, but are you truly well rested? Thanks to the device’s SleepCoach, you’ll be able to find out.

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The app determines the amount of restorative REM and deep sleep you’re truly getting so you can stay at the top of your game (even on those dreaded Mondays) and then dishes out advice to better your habits. These recommendations are tailored to each person and include everything from the optimal temperature to exactly how much sleep you need to be getting based on your personal sleep patterns. As if that wasn’t enough, Juvo even includes a built-in white noise generator to block out background sounds and a smart alarm for the perfect start to the day.

The bedside unit comes in both white and black, making it a perfect fit for any decor. Sound like something you’d love to have in your bedroom? Head over to its Indiegogo campaign, where Juvo Labs is currently seeking $50,000. Delivery is expected to begin in spring 2016.