Tag Archives: DMX

Video: Using your brain and visual stimuli to play music


This biotronic art installation creates a unique musical experience based on thoughts and emotion.


What if moving your eyes from left-to-right or up-and-down could trigger lights, play music and control other devices? That’s what digital artist Fèlix Vinyals has set out to accomplish with his latest project entitled Torval. Well sort of, at least. In collaboration with EEG and BCI researcher Oscar Portolés, the Maker has designed a hybrid brain computer machine interface (BCMI) installation that allows him to create music and control the lighting while on stage, all through the reading of the electric potential of his brain and visual stimuli.

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The project combines two independent BCI systems. The first makes use of the steady state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) technique to enable the musician to switch on/off a set of music tracks from a MIDI sample. Meanwhile, the other determines the musician’s index of relaxation that is read through the alpha rhythm to alter the illumination of the installation. The communication between the BCMI, the MIDI sampler and the set of floodlights via DMX protocol is done with an Atmel based Arduino.

Troval

Beyond that, Torval is comprised of six main modules: the visual stimuli tool, the EEG signal acquisition unit, the signal processing algorithms for both BCI systems, the output control box (Bebop), the music sampler, and the illumination system.

“On one hand, the visual stimuli tool elicits a SSVEP in the user visual cortex when he gazes at one of the six flickering stimuli. Then, the signal-processing algorithm searches the EEG data in real time for a SSVEP. When a SSVEP is found at a frequency coincident with one of the flickering stimulus units, the outputs control box will send a MIDI command to switch on or off the musical loop associated with the particular flickering stimulus unit,” Vinyals explains.

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“On the other hand, a signal-processing algorithm constantly monitors the level of relaxation of the artist – the power within the alpha rhythm of the occipital cortex. Continuously and smoothly, Bebop modifies the illumination of the stage through DMX protocol in correlation with the relaxation of the user; a shade from the color spectrum that ranges from red to blue is projected onto the stage. Therefore, the user can actively control the color of the stage. Yet, as he fully engages in the performance, he loses his ability to self-control his level of relaxation and mental load; turning the stage illumination into a genuine portrait of both physiological states.”

What’s unique about this project is that is relies only upon imagination and emotion, enabling a wearer to create a unique, irreproducible musical experience. As the video eludes to, there are eyes that speak and there are other eyes that can perform… Trust us, you’ll want to see this!

LED power management with Atmel’s XMega

LED lighting power management typically comprises power conversion, constant current regulation and fault handling. Key design considerations of LED power management include high integration capabilities, small form factor, energy efficiency, high temperature operation and support for a variety of standard lighting communication protocols.

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“That is exactly why Atmel’s XMEGA E is highly integrated to support multiple LED driver topologies, all while leaving CPU resources for additional application functionalities,” an Atmel engineering rep told Bits & Pieces. “Plus, we offer a small form factor and dual high-speed 40ns analog comparators for current regulation, with multiple high speed 128MHz timers allowing generation of fast PWM.”

The XMEGA E also boasts dual digital to analog converters for peak current management, asynchronous event system for ultra-fast response and control loops, with a custom logic (XCL) block removing external logic components.

“In terms of energy efficiency, the XMEGA E, with its rich analog peripheral features, is capable of running a complicated power control algorithm (e.g. PFC) to achieve high power efficiency,” the engineering rep continued. “Plus, the XMEGA E offers ultra low power consumption as low as 100uA/MHz in active mode and 100nA in RTC/RAM retention. Last, but certainly not least, the XMEGA E qualifies for high temperatures at 105C and 125C.”

Atmel also offers support for multiple lighting communication protocols, such as DALI via the XCL block in XMEGA E (hardware), along with DMX, LWmesh, and interface to PLC, ZigBee Light Link, ZigBee Home Automation and other wireless protocols (software). In addition, developers have easy access to Atmel Studio 6.0, Atmel Software Framework and Atmel Gallery.

Want to learn more about designing LED power management platforms with Atmel’s XMega? Be sure to check out Atmel’s extensive lighting portfolio here.

LED power management with Atmel’s XMEGA E

LEDs are typically used as indicator lamps in various devices and lighting applications. Modern LED devices are available with very high brightness across the visible, ultraviolet and infrared wavelengths.

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LED lighting power management typically consists of power conversion, constant current regulation and fault handling. Key design considerations include high integration, small form factor(s), support for a variety of standard lighting, versatile communication protocols, energy efficiency and high temperature operation capabilities.

Atmel’s ATXMEGA E AVR MCU can be used by engineers to design an advanced LED power management system that follows the above-mentioned requirements. Indeed, the XMEGA E is highly integrated to support multiple LED driver topologies – while leaving CPU resources for additional application functionalities.

Additional key ATXMEGA E AVR MCU capabilities for LED lighting power management include dual high-speed 40ns Analog Comparators for current regulation, multiple high speed 128MHz timers that facilitate fast PWM, dual digital to analog converters for peak current management, asynchronous event system for ultra-fast response and control loops, a custom logic (XCL) block that eliminates the need for external logic components and an energy efficient design.

“Plus, the XMEGA E, with its rich analog peripheral features, can run complicated power control algorithm (e.g. PFC) to achieve high power efficiency,” an Atmel engineering rep told Bits & Pieces. “The XMEGA E also offers ultra low power consumption as low as 100uA/MHz in active mode and 100nA in RTC/RAM retention. Last, but certainly not least, the XMEGA E is qualified to operate at high temperatures (105C-125C).”

In terms of lighting communication protocols, Atmel offers hardware DALI support via XCL block in XMEGA E, as well as software support for DMX, LWmesh, interface to PLC, ZigBee Light Link, ZigBee Home Automation along with a variety of wireless protocols.

Interested in learning more about Atmel’s AVR XMEGA lineup? Be sure to check out the official XMEGA page here. Additional information about Atmel’s extensive lighting portfolio can be viewed here.