Tag Archives: developers

Atmel Studio 7 is now live!


Atmel Studio 7 accelerates MCU designs for both developers and Makers alike, bridging the gap between the MakerSpace and MarketPlace.


For those who may have attended the recent World Maker Faire in New York, this announcement should come as no surprise. However, if you were unable to get to the New York Hall of Science to swing by the Atmel booth or sit in on one of our panel discussions over the weekend, we’ve got some great news. The highly anticipated Atmel Studio 7 is now live!

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Atmel Studio is a comprehensive, free integrated development environment (IDE) for microcontroller design using both Atmel | SMART ARM-based and AVR MCUs. What’s more, we are also excited to be launching Atmel START — a new, extremely intuitive graphical platform for creating and configuring embedded applications that allow developers to build custom software platforms.

Due to increased complexity and more demanding requirements, embedded developers are turning to IDEs to deliver more intelligence, performance and ease-of-use. Based on the latest Microsoft Visual Studio Shell, Atmel Studio 7 dramatically reduces overall design time by delivering significant performance enhancements for developing and debugging with a simple user interface, improved responsiveness for consumer, industrial and Maker markets, and much more. Plus, the brand-spankin’ new IDE provides real-time application data and power visualization to better optimize application performance and power utilization.

Ideal for the Maker community, the IDE lets Arduino developers quickly port their sketches created in the Arduino environment as C++ projects, and seamlessly migrate their prototypes into the professional Studio 7 environment. This will further streamline a Maker’s ability to help migrate their projects from ‘the MakerSpace to MarketPlace.’

Given the rise of the Internet of Things market and the projected billions of devices to follow, high quality, well integrated embedded software is key to enable designers to devise robust, smart solutions based on today’s connectivity and security standards. Cognizant of this, we are pleased to launch Atmel START which is a web-based tool that helps developers easily integrate basic software building blocks and focus on their own applications rather than having to deal with the headache of configuration and integration.

“Atmel Studio 7 IDE and Atmel START extend our commitment to bridge the gap between the Maker and professional environments, accelerating time-to-market for developers of all levels,” says Steve Pancoast, Atmel Vice President of Applications, Software and Tools. “Our new, innovative development tools and software provide Atmel’s customers with solutions for embedded system designs in low power and wireless communications such as our power visualizer and Atmel START. We are committed to bringing the best tools to market, enabling developers of all levels — from professionals to students, hobbyists and Makers — to get their projects quickly to market.”

Atmel START gives software developers the ability to graphically select software components and configure them for Atmel’s large family of evaluation boards or for their own custom hardware. Developers can build software platforms consisting of low-level drivers, advanced middleware, Real Time Operating Systems (RTOS), high-level communication stacks and more, as well as download the configured software package into their own IDE and make their application.

Atmel START supports graphical configuring of pin-muxes, along with clock trees, and the configured software package can be downloaded for a variety of supported development environments, such as Atmel Studio 7, IAR Embedded Workbench and Keil µVision. In addition to all that, the tool is entirely web-based so no installation is required before you get started — and the downloaded code will always be up-to-date.

“The Atmel START platform makes it easy for developers to get projects off the ground quickly and obtain the most benefit from working with ARM Keil MDK tools,” adds Reinhard Keil, ARM Director of Microcontroller Tools. “By using CMSIS, Atmel has once again proven the value of creating a platform built on a standards-based approach. Atmel START creates a robust and portable software management system that makes it easy for developers to deploy applications in any environment.”

Interested? Atmel Studio 7 is free of charge and is integrated with the Atmel Software Framework (ASF) — a large library of free source code with 1,600 project examples. Those wishing to get started with the IDE can head over to its official page here, as well as explore Atmel START in more depth by downloading the latest white paper on the platform.

The IoT is developing a head of steam

According to new data released by Evans Data Corporation, 17% of current developers are working on applications for the connected Internet of Things.

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The amorphous platform of IoT is still yet to be concretely defined, yet many see the system of connected devices and items as a wave of the future. The Evans Data report also reveals that another 23% of developers plan to begin building IoT applications within the next six months.

The survey also found that 31% of IoT developers most associate cloud computing with IoT, followed by real-time event processing (26%), big data (17%) and machine to machine (15%).

Without question, the Internet of Things will continue to be an emerging and evolving market. Though there may not be a determined path for this trend to take but as development moves forward, “The Internet of Things will be as exciting and vibrant as it is frustrating and tricky,” Wired‘s Klint Finley reminds us.

internetofthingsvisualized

“Beyond the cutesy stuff, there are some fascinating enterprise-scale applications that are emerging — such as GE’s concept of the Industrial Internet, in which major components such as aircraft engines and generator turbines are outfitted with sensors that can radio performance data back to their makers. This is where the IoT will have a real impact, and it will be interesting to see where developers take these kinds of capabilities,” writes ZDNet‘s Joe McKendrick.

With 212 billion connected devices expected to arrive within the next few years, Atmel recently joined forces with tech leaders BroadcomDellIntelSamsung and Wind River to establish a new industry group focused on improving interoperability and streamlining connectivity. The newly-unveiled Open Interconnect Consortium (OIC) looks to define a common communications framework based on industry standard technologies to wirelessly connect and intelligently manage the flow of information among personal computing and emerging Internet of Things (IoT) devices, regardless of form factor, operating system or service provider.

No matter what the future holds, the evolution of device connectivity over the next few years will be intriguing to say the least, while Atmel will continue to play a key role in the building of the Internet of Things. If you want to view the entire Evans Data Report, you can view the document here.

Croduino Basic sells for $21 on Tindie



The open source Croduino Basic – currently selling for $21 on Tindie – is built around Atmel’s wildly popular ATmega328 microcontroller (MCU).

Aside from Atmel’s MCU, the board targets both Makers and developers with a wide range of features, including:

  • 

14 digital I/O (6PWM outputs)
  • 
8 analog inputs
  • 
FTDI RS232 as USB converter
  • 
Built-in 5V voltage regulator
  • USB mini-B cable

It should be noted that Croduino measures just 5cm x 3cm, making it easy for DIY tinkerers to integrate into various projects.

Interested in learning more? You can check out the project’s official Tindie page here, courtesy of the e-radionica.com crew.

In addition, you can view the project source code here, documentation here and BoM here.