Tag Archives: analyst



Flexible display market – $3.89 billion by 2020



Industry analysts expect the flexible display market to cross the $3.89 billion threshold by 2020 – growing at an impressively high CAGR from 2014 to 2020.

“The last decade has witnessed a well-paced transformation in the flexible display technology market. Displays have evolved from CRT to plasma display (PDP) and from PDP to LCD [and] LED,” a Markets&Markets analyst explained.

“The latest display type is OLED. In the coming quarter of 2014, the flexible display smartphones are expected to hit the market with tablets to follow soon after.”

According to the analyst, laptops and TVs are also expected to follow the trend of smart phones and tablets, while OLED based televisions have also been following the same curve.

“The characteristics and features of some emerging displays are flexible, roll able and bendable displays,” the Markets&Markets analyst added.

“They are acting as the biggest drivers in the dielectric materials market. This emerging display market possesses some of the unique, distinct features such as sleekness, reliability/flexibility, and ruggedness; and thus, these displays can be utilized in most of the industries.”

As we’ve previously discussed on Bits & Pieces, Atmel’s XSense competes in the rapidly evolving flexible display market. Essentially, XSense is a high-performance, highly flexible touch sensor which allows engineers to design devices with curved surfaces and even add functionality along product edges. This offers manufacturers the capability to build light-weight, sleek, edgeless smartphones, tablets and other touch-enabled devices.

Indeed Atmel’s XSense was recently featured in an EEWeb article, with the publication describing the technology as the “next step” in touchscreen product evolution.

“XSense is a roll-to-roll metal mesh technology that can achieve high performance touch sensing capabilities on a seemingly endless variety of curved or flexible surface,” the article explained.

“With XSense already in production, OEMs have already started implementing it in the next generation of disruptive, touch-enabled devices.”

EEWeb also noted that XSense’s extremely light, thin and power features can be implemented in thinner mobile devices, curved and and contoured screens as well as edgeless designs for consumer touch-enabled devices.

“The overall thinness of this touchscreen film allows for superior clarity on the device display, low sheet resistance and low power consumption, allowing for numerous benefits for implementation,” the publication concluded.

“XSense allows for thinner sensor stacks within the device, meaning that not only is the display twice as thin as average touchscreen sense film, but that the device itself can be reduced in size.”

It should also be noted that Jennifer Colegrove, who owns Touch Display Research in Santa Clara, Calif., says the potential market for XSense and similar technologies will increase from $200 million in 2013 to $4 billion by 2020, primarily for tablet computers and other larger mobile devices.

Similarly, Hans Mosesmann, a technology analyst for Raymond James & Associates, says the market for touchscreen sensors will grow at an annual rate of 44 percent during the next three years to about $10 billion due to its lower cost, size and performance.

Interested in learning more about Atmel’s XSense technology? You can check out the official XSense page here and read about Atmel’s recently launched XSense contest here.

Do wearables require a new kind of ecosystem?

Forrester analyst JP Gownder says tech companies must create a new type of ecosystem for wearables and the Internet of Things (IoT). However, this ecosystem shouldn’t necessarily focus on developers, hardware makers or service companies.

Image Credit: Adafruit (Atmel-powered Gemma)

Rather, Gownder believes it should prioritize brands, healthcare providers, retailers, financial services companies and governments.

“Let’s be honest: A lot of 1.0 wearables devices are ugly, and tech companies aren’t always the best purveyors of fashion,” Gownder writes in a recent blog post. 

”The wristwatch has been around since 1571 – so watches have a deep cultural history into which smartwatches must integrate themselves. Partnerships between wearable vendors and fashion brands [sic] will be critical.”

Similarly, says Gownder, health and fitness wearables must become embedded in the normative healthcare system.

“Having doctors, hospitals, insurance companies, and corporate wellness programs distribute fitness wearables embeds the information collected into the entire healthcare system,” he continues. 

”Doctors can use the data to treat patients, leading to better health outcomes. And consumers can sometimes receive a discount on their health insurance rates by participating.”

Last, but certainly not least, Gownder envisions a retail future where a wearable device owner walks into a store, is greeted by name and offered customized clothing options in his or her own size.

“Yet, this entire wearable scenario depends on adoption of the technology by retailers,” he emphasizes.

However, Gownder remains understandably optimistic about wearables, noting earlier this week in an InformationWeek article that the rapidly evolving technology represents the next logical step in the mobile revolution.

“If done right – with vigorous ecosystems of brands, retailers, healthcare providers, and even governments tapping into their value – wearables will create more efficient and seamless experiences for wearers,” he concludes.

“As consumers discover the value of wearables, technology managers can expect to see employees bringing smartwatches, smartglasses and other wearables into the workplace. For some of these wearables, existing practices for smartphones and tablets (like the use of mobile device management services) can be adjusted to accommodate new wearable devices.”