Rewind: These brands are embracing the Maker Movement


A look at how major brands can leverage the burgeoning Maker Movement and IoT to enhance both the customer experience and their marketing efforts. 


If you need any further validation that the Maker Movement has picked up steam, just take look at what some major brands have done over the last several months.

Netflix

The Adafruit Pro Trinket-equipped Netflix Socks detect when you’ve dozed off and send a signal to your TV, automatically pausing whatever it is you’re binge-watching.

Adidas

3054494-inline-s-2-this-sneaker-was-3-d-printed-from-ocean-waste.jpg

This concept shoe is made up of an upper constructed from ocean plastic materials along with a 3D-printed midsole of recycled polyester and gill net.

New Balance

This pair of high-performance running shoes will include a 3D printed-midsole.

Nike

The Back to the Future II-inspired, self-lacing Nike Mags are now a reality.

Lexus

This concept RC F connects to a driver and displays their heartbeat in real-time through electro-luminescent paint.

Disney

The turtlish BeachBot autonomously creates large scale sand drawings.

Facebook

parse1.png

The Parse for IoT SDK supports the Arduino Zero with the Wi-Fi 101 Shield as well as the Arduino Yún.

Royal Caribbean

The cruise line’s latest groundbreaking ships, the Quantum of the Seas and Anthem of the Seas, features two bartending robotic arms that precisely mix drinks to order.

Amazon

The online empire revealed the latest prototype of drones it will deploy as part of its Prime Air service, as well as a connected Dash Button that lets shoppers reorder frequently used household products with a simple touch.

Dole

This ‘wearable’ banana, which was designed for the Tokyo Marathon, is equipped with an LED display and sensors under its skin. The smart fruit monitors a runner’s race time and heart rate, and even shows tweets urging them onwards.

Kagome

This piggybacking robot, aptly named Tomatan, feeds a wearer tomatoes as they jog.

Levi’s

The clothing company partnered with Google’s Project Jacquard to bring touch-sensitive smartphone control to jeans.

AIAIAI

The Booty Drum is a wearable unit that turns ‘twerking’ into music. (NSFW.)

EasyJet

The European airline, with the help of CuteCircuits, unveiled a first-of-its kind smart uniform for both cabin crew and aircraft engineers. The futuristic, LED-laden outfits will enhance communication and passenger safety procedures.

GE

The company’s FirstBuild microfactory debuted an affordable, in-home nugget ice machine, Opal, that went on to garner more than $2 million on Indiegogo.

Local Motors

The manufacturer plans to begin selling the first highway-ready, 3D-printed cars next year within the price range of $18,000 to $30,000.

Hershey’s

The sweets giant partnered with 3D Systems to make an advanced chocolate 3D printer.

Barilla

The pasta maker held a 3D printing competition to explore new shapes and designs.

Crocs

The shoe brand showed off a possible future alternative to heading out to its store by experimenting with drones as a delivery option at a pop-up store in Japan.

Domino’s

Dominos-2.jpg

The Easy Order smart button pairs to a smartphone app via Bluetooth and makes ordering your favorite pizza simpler than ever.

Hoover

Rplic

The company let customers 3D print parts for their vacuums by downloading the accessories on Thingiverse.

Huit Denim

The UK jean specialist used Bare Conductive’s Electric Paint and Arduino to turn its window storefront into a touch interface.

Samsung

The Talking Fridge was embedded with Arduino-based sensors to detect customers and sell itself in real-time.

… and while not the brainchild of McDonald’s itself, this project was pretty awesome. The McNugget vending machine is comprised entirely out of LEGO. Simply insert a €2 coin, sit back and let it deliver a box of chicken in seconds, complete with the requisite dipping sauce.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s