Hacking a Nespresso machine with an ATmega328P

If there are a couple of things engineers love, tinkering and coffee rank high on that list. To our delight, a Maker by the name of Guido Burger brought to our attention one of his latest builds powered by an ATmega328P, of course.

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Along with fellow members of his Fab-Lab team, Burger has created the first open sensor platform for the Internet of Things, which uses a combination of Arduino IDE and Bluetooth Low Energy driven by just a single coin cell battery. Aptly named blueIOT, the platform is equipped with a certified BLE module and an ATmega328P MCU at its core.

Here, you can see the hacked Nespresso Inissia coffee maker. The black box is hosting the blueIOT module, optocoppler and a relay to physically decouple the machine from the control unit.

A closer look at the hacked Nespresso Inissia coffee maker. Here, you can see the black box that hosts the blueIOT module, along with an optocoupler and a relay that physically decouple the machine from the control unit.

Most recently, the Maker successfully hacked a Nespresso machine using the blueIOT to control his new makeshift device. Among the various tasks the ‘smarter’ coffee maker can carry out include awaking the device from power safe mode, beginning to brew a morning cup ‘o joe, changing the coffee/water mix, as well as starting the cleaning process — all made possible through a simple Arduino code running on the ATmega328P and the blueIOT’s ultra-low power design.

A peek inside the coffee maker.

A peek inside the coffee maker.

Furthermore, the gadget serves as an iBeacon, sharing the proximity of a user to the coffee maker via its companion smartphone app.

“This will be the cheapest BLE-enabled coffee maker based on a Nespresso mass market coffee maker… and simple to rebuild in less than two hours… It might be the first coffee maker actually being an iBeacon too,” Burger adds.

blueIOT and a Darlington driver running the relay (black on bottom), optocoupler (red) running Arduino code on the ATmega328P.

blueIOT and a Darlington driver running the relay (black on bottom), along with an optocoupler (red) running Arduino code on the ATmega328P.

Did this project perk your interest? If so, head on over to Fab Labs official page here to learn more about blueIOT and other related hacks.

1 thought on “Hacking a Nespresso machine with an ATmega328P

  1. Pingback: pico-Platinchen is a pocket-sized, Arduino-compatible wearable board | Bits & Pieces from the Embedded Design World

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