HackADay talks CryptoCape

The CryptoCape – which recently made its debut on SparkFun – is a dedicated security daughterboard for the BeagleBone designed in collaboration with Cryptotronix’s Josh Datko, which features Atmel’s Trusted Platform Module and SHA-256 Authenticator.

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HackADay’s Brian Benchoff was lucky enough to catch up with Josh and asked him to break down how the nifty device works.

“If you need to add security to your project or you want to learn more about embedded security the CryptoCape adds encryption and authentication options,” the Maker added.

As its webpage notes, the CryptoCape functions as the BeagleBone’s first dedicated security daughterboard. Known as a BeagleBone Cape, the device attaches to the expansion headers of the BeagleBone and “adds specialized ICs that perform various cryptographic operations which will allow you to add a hardware security layer to your BeagleBone project.”

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Previously discussed on Bits & Pieces, the CyrptoCape is packed with hardware, including 256k EEPROM with a defaulted I2C address (plus write protection), a real-time clock (RTC) module, a trusted platform module (TPM) for RSA encryption/decryption, an AES-128 encrypted EEPROM, an Atmel ATSHA204 authentication chip that performs SHA-256 and HMAC-25 and an Atmel ATECC108 that performs the Elliptic Curve Digital Signature Algorithm (ECDSA).

The reasoning behind the developer’s choice to use the SHA-256 Authenticator? “It creates 256-bit keys that can be used in keyed Message Authentication Codes (MACs), or HMAC, to prove the authenticity of the device.” In addition, the authenticator allows the device to “implement an anti-counterfeiting system with the exchange of nonces and MACs between other embedded devices.”

If you are interested in boosting the security of your Maker project or learning more about the CryptoCape, you can head to the product’s official SparkFun page here.

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