Driving LED backlit industrial displays with Atmel tech

Bits & Pieces is continuing its in-depth tour of Atmel’s versatile lighting portfolio. Thus far, we’ve highlighted the stalwart AVR AT90PWM microcontroller and talked about how Atmel MCUs are used to light up both fluorescent and HID ballasts, as well as drive television direct backlights and various high voltage edge-lit TV topologies.

And today we’ll be taking a closer look at the role Atmel tech can play when it comes to LED backlit industrial displays. Specifically, how an integrated DC-to to-DC power supply controller and internal current sinks reduce component count, while providing design flexibility and offering lowest overall system solution cost.

“These advanced devices also offer a digital control loop, which means they require no external components to manage the LED supply and regulate LED current up to 30mA per LED string with up to 12 LEDs per string,” an Atmel engineering rep told Bits & Pieces.

atmelledindustrial

“LED dimming is achieved through an external PWM signal or an internal 8-bit PWM engine. Analog dimming of LED string current is available for use with an ambient light sensor (ALS) and/or temperature management with a thermistor or IC temperature sensor.”

Additionally, Atmel offers LED driver modules/reference designs for industrial displays. These LED driver modules are compact and highly efficient LED driver boards designed to offer prototype or production ready platforms. Schematic, Layout and BOM files are also available for porting into an overall solution. And yes, pre-programmed LED drivers are also available.

Interested in learning more about Atmel devices targeted at LED backlit industrial displays? Be sure to check out our full device breakdown here.

1 thought on “Driving LED backlit industrial displays with Atmel tech

  1. Pingback: Lighting control, Atmel style | Bits & Pieces from the Embedded Design World

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s