A practical guide to Atmel AVR microcontrollers

Earlier this month, we took a close look at at an instructional book for Makers that describes how to use various Atmel-powered Arduino boards in a wide variety of LEGO projects, as well as another Maker book titled “Arduino Workshop: A Hands-On Introduction with 65 Projects.”

But what if you wanted to get up close and personal with an Atmel AVR microcontroller (MCU), sans the board? Well, you might want to check out “Practical AVR Microcontrollers.” Written by Alan Trevennor, the book kicks off with the basics in part one – setting up a development environment and detailing how a “naked” AVR differs from a classic Arduino.

mcupracticalguide

Part two offers an in-depth exploration of various projects, including an illuminated secret panel, a hallway lighting system with a waterfall effect, a crazy lightshow and visual effects gizmos like a Moire wheel and shadow puppets.

“You’ll design and implement some home automation projects, including working with wired and wireless setups,” Trevennor explained. “Along the way, you’ll design a useable home automation protocol and look at a variety of hardware setups.”

Readers will also learn the following:

  • How programming the AVR differs from programming an Arduino
  • How to use the Arduino IDE to program the AVR and when to use AVR Studio
  • How to network your AVR devices and use them in home automation
  • How to add intelligence to your AVR devices
  • How to design games with an AVR

Interested? The e-book version of “Practical AVR Microcontrollers” can be purchased from Amazon for $22.79 here.

4 thoughts on “A practical guide to Atmel AVR microcontrollers

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