About the Post

Author Information

Infographic: Made in the USA

With the month of July officially underway, Atmel is celebrating Independence Day in patriotic fashion, paying tribute to one of the quintessential cornerstones of the nation’s economic engine – manufacturing. Before cueing the Springsteen, firing up the grills and preparing for your 4th of July festivities, we’re celebrating U.S. manufacturing with this nifty infographic, “Made in the USA.”

Just weeks following the inaugural White House Maker Faire, it’s evident that the revival of American manufacturing is upon us, as the rise of the Maker Movement represents a significant opportunity for the United States. Last month, President Obama by increasing the ability of more Americans, young and old, to have access to tools and techniques that can bring their ideas to life.

“Today’s DIY is tomorrow’s ‘Made in America,” urged President Obama. “Your projects are examples of a revolution that’s taking place in American manufacturing – a revolution that can help us create new jobs and industries decades from now.”

10338779_884820584868446_6970383266523170177_n

Whether it’s Makers at home, students in universities or engineers in R&D, manufacturing is on the rise. It’s making a comeback and fueling innovation! Although a global corporation, Atmel is proud of the spirit of what many are calling the manufacturing renaissance here in the United States – in both Silicon Valley and Colorado Springs.

In just the past three years, the U.S. has experienced the creation 500,000 jobs, with Atmel the proud employer of 1,532 manufacturing employees. Bolstering American manufacturing is one of the best ways to increase the number of jobs – that manufacturing is at the core of the American ethos.

As in other parts of the country, businesses related to manufacturing have always played an important role in Silicon Valley. Throughout most of the 20th century, it was the American manufacturing industry that helped create the foundation for the middle class. It was the engine responsible for propelling the U.S. to global economic prominence, while setting the standard for quality; be it for cars, television sets or semiconductors.

As manufacturing boomed, industrialization came to change the very fabric of American life, symbiotically. Today, the semiconductor industry directly employs a quarter of a million people in the U.S. and supports more than one million additional American jobs. In 2013, U.S. semiconductor company sales totaled $155 billion – helping to make the global trillion dollar electronics industry possible. The U.S. has also seen a 52 percent increase in investment in the R&D semiconductor space, with $10 billion between 2007 and 2012. To be sure, U.S. semiconductor companies currently represent over half the worldwide market and are responsible for one of America’s largest exports.

Even in troubled economic times, the U.S. has managed to add approximately 520,000 manufacturing jobs since January 2010 and supports 17.2 million manufacturing jobs as a whole, with post-recession American manufacturing outpacing other nations. Nearly 12 million (about one in 10) people in the U.S. are employed directly in manufacturing.

Semiconductors – the little microchips controlling all modern electronics – are part and parcel of the American manufacturing landscape. As the building blocks of technology, they’re an integral component of America’s economic strength, national security and global competitiveness. Even more importantly, they’re used to develop the technologies helping us build a better future.

Most notably, the President notes that the path to this new era of American manufacturing has never been easier, citing the new tools and tech that are making the building of things easier than ever. Through resources and technology offered through the likes of Atmel-powered devices and other maker communities, we’ve reached a point at which there’s a democratization of manufacturing.

Sparklers and fireworks aside, today Atmel embraces the official observance of the national holiday through showcasing the best of U.S. manufacturing, investing and more. With that said, the Atmel team wishes you a very Happy 4th of July!

Fourthofjuly_InfoGraphic_Final Print_V3

 

Tags: , , , , , ,

3 Comments on “Infographic: Made in the USA”

  1. Please stop calling it a Maker Movement it’s a “RE – Maker Movement” the best makers were from the early 1960’s to maybe the mid 1990’s it slowed down but did not stop, the makers then in the years 60’s to 80’s made there own TV sets, Radios, Computers, Ham Radios, and Robots from Heath Kits, being a maker is nothing new, it’s just the 20 something are not taught the history of the makers, I’m Generation – M, M for maker I call it, I’m from when we built everything, we fixed everything and went to the moon on a slide rule, sorry to bust your bubble but being a maker is nothing new, but keep up the great work, Happy 4th. Dan Mathis Robotics Scientist at FutureBots Humanoid Lab.

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Video: Drone flies into fireworks | Bits & Pieces from the Embedded Design World - July 7, 2014

    […] Oh, and i you’re still in the patriotic holiday spirit, don’t forget to check out this ‘Made in the USA’ infographic! […]

  2. 3D printing set for speedy delivery | Bits & Pieces from the Embedded Design World - July 10, 2014

    […] its potential size, the USPS believes 3D printing could start to reshore previously outsourced manufacturing back to the United States. In the very near future, it appears 3D printing could be a powerful engine for job creation and […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 485 other followers

%d bloggers like this: